Archive for the ‘Black Poverty’ Category

Big businesses that benefit from Prison Labour

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Corporations Profiting From The Prison Industrial Complex

As the United States continues to lead the world in the percentage of its population that it incarcerates, there are dozens of companies that profit from the mass incarceration epidemic.  Inmates provide companies with cheap, easy to control labor without them being required to provide workers with health insurance or sick days.  Corporations who use prison labor also do not have to worry about having to consider family or vacation time for employees.  Corporations also get away with paying inmates between 90 cents and $4 a day.

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Charity, Music and Politics with Band Aid 30

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Charity, Music and Politics are not comfortable bedfellows. At least half the audience will not be happy. But does it really matter – if money will be raised anyway for a good cause. Let us examine the new Bob Geldof project.

We puzzled over the pictures from #BandAid30. Yes, it is a good cause, but why was there so little  involvement from black artists and why are the lyrics so bad?

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U. S. Minorities Losing Economic Ground

Chicago Hosts Job Fair For City Jobs

National Urban League discusses the State of Black America 2014.

Report by   JESSE J. HOLLAND, 3rd April 2014.

African-Americans and Latinos are losing economic ground when compared with whites in the areas of employment and income as the United States pulls itself out of the Great Recession, the latest State of Black America report from the National Urban League says.

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Kibera Examined

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Kibera: Nairobi’s Biggest Slum Challenges the Development Narrative

Kibera is home to between 150k to one million people. The population is transient and undocumented so its difficult to fix a figure.

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Oprah finds many ways to Give Back

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A little-known statistic even the most altruistic don’t realize until they wade into heavy-duty giving: The majority of philanthropic initiatives don’t work; 75% close up shop in their first year. Even so, there’s merit in the effort: As in business, failures lead to insights and breakthroughs. With her immense wealth, Oprah has sort to make a difference in lives through education and various other charitable projects.

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RACE AND POVERTY, FIFTY YEARS AFTER THE MARCH with MLK

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RACE AND POVERTY, FIFTY YEARS AFTER THE MARCH.  What Has Changed?

POSTED BY Vauhini Vara. AUGUST 27, 2013
When we talk about the historic civil-rights gathering whose fifty-year anniversary will be celebrated on Wednesday, we usually call it the March on Washington. In fact, the full name of the event was the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom; early in his speech, Martin Luther King, Jr., lamented that black Americans lived “on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity.” The marchers had ten demands for Congress, at least four of which were aimed at improving black people’s financial circumstances and narrowing the gulf between black and white Americans’ economic opportunities.Fifty years later, that gulf hasn’t changed much. By some measures it has widened.

You Really HAVE TO WANT TO WIN

Tupac Skakur

Change Our Minds and We’ll Change Everything

by Stacy Tisdale.

The Way We Think about Money is the Real Problem

I was recently discussing what I call “Major Money Moments in Black History” with a dear friend named Marcia Canterella. Marcia is the daughter of great civil rights activist Whitney Young and author of I Can Finish College. Major money moments in black history are events that changed the course of our financial experience. Take desegregation, for example. Prior to desegregation, so many of us thrived in the business world as we provided products and services to our community. I’m not debating the social merits of desegregation, but it did result in a dramatic decline in black-owned businesses.

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High black poverty a shame in the U.S. of A.

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Regional Insights: High black poverty a shame
By Harold D. Miller

The Pittsburgh region has received many accolades over the past year for its high quality of life and the resilience of its economy. But our community also is No. 1 in the nation on an issue that should be a source of shame, not pride.
According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the Pittsburgh region has the highest rate of poverty among working-age African-Americans of any of the 40 largest metropolitan regions in the country. More than one-quarter (28 percent) of the region’s African-Americans ages 18 to 64 lived in poverty in 2008. That’s twice as high as in regions such as Baltimore and Charlotte, N.C.

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Change Your Mind and You Change Everything

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Change Your Mind and You Change Everything

Throughout my career, I have interviewed many blacks who have created healthy financial lives and many who have not. A major difference in the two groups is how they view money and how they view themselves.

A common view, but look at two responses to this.

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Lending Discrimination

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Lending Discrimination
written by Richard Green
(who writes about real estate, mortgage finance and urban development)

A recent radio programme (November 2013) “This American Life” explored The Legacy Of Lending Discrimination Against African-Americans.

America’s neighborhoods, 45 years after the passage of the Equal Housing Act, remain segregated. In Milwaukee, our most segregated city, 81 percent of African-Americans would need to move in order for Wisconsin’s largest city to be perfectly integrated; in New York, our largest city, 79 percent would have to move.

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