Archive for the ‘Issues’ Category

Kibera Examined

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Kibera: Nairobi’s Biggest Slum Challenges the Development Narrative

Kibera is home to between 150k to one million people. The population is transient and undocumented so its difficult to fix a figure.

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RACE AND POVERTY, FIFTY YEARS AFTER THE MARCH with MLK

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RACE AND POVERTY, FIFTY YEARS AFTER THE MARCH.  What Has Changed?

POSTED BY Vauhini Vara. AUGUST 27, 2013
When we talk about the historic civil-rights gathering whose fifty-year anniversary will be celebrated on Wednesday, we usually call it the March on Washington. In fact, the full name of the event was the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom; early in his speech, Martin Luther King, Jr., lamented that black Americans lived “on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity.” The marchers had ten demands for Congress, at least four of which were aimed at improving black people’s financial circumstances and narrowing the gulf between black and white Americans’ economic opportunities.Fifty years later, that gulf hasn’t changed much. By some measures it has widened.

You Really HAVE TO WANT TO WIN

Tupac Skakur

Change Our Minds and We’ll Change Everything

by Stacy Tisdale.

The Way We Think about Money is the Real Problem

I was recently discussing what I call “Major Money Moments in Black History” with a dear friend named Marcia Canterella. Marcia is the daughter of great civil rights activist Whitney Young and author of I Can Finish College. Major money moments in black history are events that changed the course of our financial experience. Take desegregation, for example. Prior to desegregation, so many of us thrived in the business world as we provided products and services to our community. I’m not debating the social merits of desegregation, but it did result in a dramatic decline in black-owned businesses.

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High black poverty a shame in the U.S. of A.

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Regional Insights: High black poverty a shame
By Harold D. Miller

The Pittsburgh region has received many accolades over the past year for its high quality of life and the resilience of its economy. But our community also is No. 1 in the nation on an issue that should be a source of shame, not pride.
According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the Pittsburgh region has the highest rate of poverty among working-age African-Americans of any of the 40 largest metropolitan regions in the country. More than one-quarter (28 percent) of the region’s African-Americans ages 18 to 64 lived in poverty in 2008. That’s twice as high as in regions such as Baltimore and Charlotte, N.C.

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Lending Discrimination

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Lending Discrimination
written by Richard Green
(who writes about real estate, mortgage finance and urban development)

A recent radio programme (November 2013) “This American Life” explored The Legacy Of Lending Discrimination Against African-Americans.

America’s neighborhoods, 45 years after the passage of the Equal Housing Act, remain segregated. In Milwaukee, our most segregated city, 81 percent of African-Americans would need to move in order for Wisconsin’s largest city to be perfectly integrated; in New York, our largest city, 79 percent would have to move.

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Guyana boasts a remarkably rich ecology, but also has one of South America’s poorest economies.

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Guyana boasts a remarkably rich ecology, but also has one of South America’s poorest economies.

Tropical rainforests – filled with distinctive plants and trees, teeming with exotic birds, insects and mammals – are a big draw for eco-tourists. But political troubles, ethnic tension and economic mismanagement have left the former British colony with serious economic problems.

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Poverty in Africa Begins With a Lack of Clean Water

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The lack of water is an often insurmountable obstacle to helping oneself. You can’t grow food, you can’t build housing, you can’t stay healthy, you can’t stay in school and you can’t keep working.

Without clean water, the possibility of breaking out of the cycle of poverty is incredibly slim.

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Transforming to create jobs and end poverty in Africa

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Africa today presents a mixed picture. Economic growth is defying expectations. Yet, the continent as a whole is short of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) for 2015. The challenge then is to make growth equitable and strengthen policy interventions for reducing poverty. The question is how? The answer is the structural transformation of African economies.

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Poverty

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Relative poverty is a term used on the news to mean people who have less money than those living around them. This term is generally used when talking, for example about “UK child poverty”. (Politicians even argue about whether such differences in wealth are a good or bad thing.)

Absolute poverty is different. Some people are much poorer. For them, a whole week’s income is less than the amount someone in the UK, on the legal minimum wage, earns in an hour (£5.93).

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Africa Hunger and Poverty Facts

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The UN Food and Agriculture Organization estimates that 239 million people in sub-Saharan Africa were hungry/undernourished in 2010 (its most recent estimate). 925 million people were hungry worldwide. Africa was the continent with the second largest number of hungry people, as Asia and the Pacific had 578 million, principally due to the much larger population of Asia when compared to sub-Saharan Africa. Sub-Saharan Africa actually had the largest proportion of its population undernourished, an estimated 30 percent in 2010, compared to 16 percent in Asia and the Pacific (FAO 2010).  Thus almost one in three people who live in sub-Saharan Africa were hungry, far higher than any other region of the world, with the exception of South Asia.

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