Archive for the ‘Historical Events’ Category

Black Twitterati

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Twitter has become more powerful than the inventors imagined.  It has created new stars and given a voice to the everyday man or woman in the street. It has also caused people to lose jobs, lose endorsements, and brought down Governments.   According to a 2013 report, 26 percent of African Americans who use the Internet use Twitter, compared to 14 percent of online white, non-Hispanic Americans. In addition, 11 percent of African-American Twitter users say they use Twitter at least once a day, compared to 3 percent of white users.  Of course, these figures could have doubled by now in 2015, but one this is for sure, there is powerful movement online formed of mostly black people who use Twitter.

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Bill Clinton – 50th Anniversary of MLK “I have a Dream” – Speech

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Former President Bill Clinton delivered the following remarks at the “Let Freedom Ring” ceremony to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington on Aug. 28, 2013 at the Lincoln Memorial.

Lewis Howard Latimer – Patent Expert

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ewis Howard Latimer was born in Chelsea, Massachusetts, on September 4, 1848, to parents who had fled slavery. Latimer learned the art of mechanical drawing while working at a patent firm. Over the course of his career as a draftsman, Latimer worked closely with Thomas Edison and Alexander Graham Bell, in addition to designing his own inventions. He died in Flushing, Queens, New York, on December 11, 1928.

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Organization of Black Airline Pilots, Inc. (Organization of Black Aerospace Professionals)

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Overview

For years, black aviation history, like most black experiences in America, has been relegated to the back pages of newspapers or to footnotes in books and journals.

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Amistad Research Center

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The Amistad Research Center’s ties to the American Missionary Association (AMA) can be traced to the AMA’s roots in the coalition of abolitionists who came to the defense of the Amistad Africans. Under the banner of the Amistad Defense Committee, abolitionists and attorneys, with help from former President John Quincy Adams, took the case to the United States Supreme Court, which ruled that the Africans were free.

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